Bayleys news & articles


Pending irrigation scheme water access set to add value to livestock grazing blocks on the market for sale

Tags: Rural

Two blocks of livestock grazing pastureland - with the potential to have access to a substantial sustainable water supply enabling conversion of the property into highly productive horticultural land - have been placed on the market for sale.


The 33.41-hectare property in two titles at Te Kopuru on the Poutu Peninsula is just south of Dargaville in Northland.

The pair of freehold lots 2 and 18 at Redhill Cemetery Road in Te Kopuru are now being marketed for sale by tender through Bayleys Whangarei, with the tender process closing on February 3. Salespeople Vinni Bhula and Todd Skudder said buyers had the opportunity tender for either of the blocks individually, or as a combined offering.

Lot 2 comprises 16.05-hectares, while adjoining lot 18 consists of 17.36-hectares. Both lots are classified as featuring flat to gently rolling topographic contours.

“There is a clear opportunity to develop the blocks into highly-productive horticultural use,” Bhula said.

“Based on the Redhill and Te Kopuru sands soil types at the location, potential horticultural development options for the blocks ranges from avocados, citrus, bananas and coffee, through to blueberries, raspberries and strawberries.

“With minimal farm infrastructure currently on either of the blocks, and only a smattering of trees dotted over the scape, there is a blank canvas opportunity for a new owner to take advantage of the pending access to irrigation water and develop their property to their specific vision.”

Bhula said that by using modern medium to high-density model growth programmes, new avocado plantings can start producing commercial yields of the crop within three to four years of planting – and this was an obvious option for the Te Kopuru blocks.

Skudder said farmland in the Te Kopuru district had been selling for between $25,000 - $30,000 per hectare based on historical sheep and beef or dairying use.

“Conversion to horticultural production however brings in a different dynamic to the equation when compared to suitable horticulture land in Whangarei and Kerikeri where prices now range from $150,000 - $200,000 per hectare… if you can find,” said Skudder.

“Development of avocado orcharding activities in the Dargaville region is simply the next evolutionary phase of Northland’s expanding avocado hubs in and around Maungatapere just out of Whangarei, and up Waiharara north of Kaitaia.

“The ability to access a secure water supply is going to change land usage in the Mid-North, and the blocks for sale at Te Kopuru are a reflection of where this trend is heading.

“Two commercial packhouses at Maungatapere and Maunu are already servicing the sector in the Mid-North - grading and packing produce for both the domestic and export markets.”

Data from the Ministry of Primary Industries forecasts that revenue from New Zealand’s horticultural exports is set to rise by five percent to $6.9billion in the year to June 30 2022, growing by a further four percent to $7.2billion in the year to June 2023.

A report produced by MPI’s economic intelligence unit highlights that avocados are New Zealand’s fifth biggest horticultural export - enjoying a compound annual growth rate of 11 percent in export revenues over the last 12 years to 2019.

“At the same time, growing demand in Asian markets presents an opportunity New Zealand exporters should exploit,” said the report.

Click here for more information on the listing.

Related articles